Humanitarian celeb Jon Bon Jovi uses star power wisely

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Jon Bon Jovi is an American musician and actor. His rock band Bon Jovi is still popular around the world after three decades as a hair band. In the news on Apr. 11, 2013, dispelling rumors that the band’s guitarist Richie Sambora had quit the band just hours before they were scheduled to perform live in concert after having an alleged argument with the sexy green celeb, the recent attention to him gives humanitarians a sense of pride — positive or negative. Why? Because the rock star chooses to use his star power so wisely and makes the best of things no matter what rumors are served up for him to deal with on his daily plate.

Bon Jovi was born John Francis Bongiovi Jr. on March 2, 1962, in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, according to Biography.com. He started playing the club scene at age sixteen. After playing with bands like Atlantic City Expressway, The Rest, The Lechers and John Bongiovi and the Wild Ones, he had his first hit single with Runaway.  He later signed with Polygram records and was on his way to an acting career and a solo music career.

In 1989, he married karate champion Dorothea Hurley, appeared in his first movie, Young Guns II, and grabbed a best song Golden Globe Blaze of Glory. Bon Jovi and his wife have four children: Stephanie, Jesse, Jacob and Romeo Jon.

At age 50, Bon Jovi still works to end the cycle of poverty and loss with his own charity, the Bon Jovi Soul Foundation. The foundation has no shortage of celebrity support from the Philadelphia Soul Arena Football Team and its owners.

In October 2011, he opened his charity restaurant, The Soul Kitchen, where customers are charged what they can pay. It is an amazing place where the poor can dine with the same respect as those who can afford — and if someone does not have the money to buy a meal they can opt to eat and volunteer serve.

In a December 2012 Denver Post article, he talked openly about his 19-year-old daughter, Stephanie Bongiovi, who went through a heroin overdose in November 2012. He also talked about his philanthropy, saying, “My philanthropy is no relation to anybody else’s. None. My philanthropy and what we do at the foundation speaks for itself and has no relation to anyones… I [can only talk] about what I do at the Soul Kitchen [my community restaurant in New Jersey]. It’s a whole other level. It’s millions of dollars in a foundation that does stuff.”

He also has an eco-friendly web store, where he sells green tote bags and collectibles.

When it comes to good will networking, he seems to really understand the foundations of getting free press for his non-profit organizations. The well-liked rocker was cheeky enough (noted the UK Mirror) to invite UK Prime Minister David Cameron and Ed Miliband to his UK concert tour in June of 2012. His invitation appeared to have been intentionally sent to publicize his charity while simultaneously giving him the chance to meet and hang out with two well-respected public figures he admires.

International Business Times reports that Bon Jovi will receive a MUSICIANS ON A MISSION AWARD in April. This award recognizes musicians or other entities in the music community for their contribution in supporting charities and humanitarian causes.

Bon Jovi was also thoughtful enough to put on a free show for snowed-in Connecticut fans after his February 9 concert was canceled, according to OK Celebrity News.

The latest woes of 2013 with Richie Sambora quitting the band (at least for the time being) have not dampened his spirits any. He’s still touring and backs up the guitar player’s story that he had to quit the tour for personal reasons — not because he had a falling out with any one particular band member.

And that’s a pretty cool working relationship to have, knowing that no matter what your boss is (above all else) a compassionate humanitarian. Hopefully, Sambora will get his personal life back on track quickly and opt to rejoin the band on stage for future rock the house opportunities.

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